The New York Times Wants to Know if You’ve had Dinner with Your Neighbours

The 'Race' Race mural, inspired by New York Times columns

The ‘Race’ Race mural, inspired by New York Times columns

On the subject of reader engagement, the above is a classroom mural inspired by Nick Kristof’s post-Ferguson columns, “When Whites Just Don’t Get It.”   Another example of reader engagement will be in the New York Times magazine, which is using the Times Reader Insight panel as guinea pigs for journalism.  It’s asking them questions such as whether you’ve had dinner with your neighbours, and “Let’s say you are at a party and people are talking about a particular book that everyone has read except for you. Do you admit you haven’t read it, or do you fake it?”  I’m curious to find out if NYT readers are dinner party frauds.

For Tuesday’s class, please spend some time looking at Snowfall, which we will discuss in class.   Also, read the leaked Innovation Report. In case you want to see them again, class slides are in the Ctools site, under yesterday’s date.

ASSIGNMENT: Write a 400-word post comparing the treatment of one story in the paper version of the NYT with its online counterpart.  You should make reference to the aims contained within the Innovation report, and assess to what extent the online presentation meets those criteria.  You should pick a story related to your beat.  What are the strengths and weaknesses of each presentation?  How long did you spend on each?  (for 8am, 20th Jan)

Notes: Please also ensure that you have a working twitter account before next class.  The updated syllabus is in Ctools.

 

Consuming News

Courtesy of AUD

Courtesy of AUD

How do we consume the news?  That’s the question we’ll be thinking about in the blogposts for Thursday’s class.   And that’s what’s obsessing news organisations, particularly the vexed issue of how millennials consume the new.   The Charlotte Observer has been testing one strategy – the Charlotte Five – a newsletter which also includes ‘Seinfeld Journalism’, or stuff that people talk about that isn’t really news.   Pew has a new study out which finds that, when it comes to social media sites, Facebook is still king.

Before Thursday’s class, please read the first 45 pages of Post-Industrial Journalism, and have a glance at this graphic. We will also discuss A New Consensus on the Future of News.